NORTH UIST SELF CATERING ACCOMMODATION: TWO SELF CATERING HOLIDAY HOMES
OVERLOOKING THE SOUND OF HARRIS, ON THE HEBRIDEAN ISLAND OF NORTH UIST

Self Catering North Uist
Photo of bird: Ringed Plover
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Wildlife

The property owner is a keen naturalist and wildlife photographer and will be pleased to advise and help guests on the best locations in the area to view wildlife.

The Cheesebay area of North Uist in particular is a superb locality for watching birds and wildlife.

RazorbillRed-Necked Phalarope

The Lochportain Common, surrounding the properties, has a large population of Red Deer that often come down from the hills to graze on the croft land. Common Seals also haul themselves out onto the rocks of The Strom in front of the house and you are always in with a chance of seeing the illusive Otter, as there has been a family in residence close by for some time now.

As the tide ebbs and flows Oystercatchers, Redshank, Dunlin, Shelduck, Eider, Herons and Cormorants can all usually be seen feeding in the exposed mud of The Strom. Heron’s here in North Uist nest in stunted Rowan trees and there are many small heronries on nearby Lochans and on the offshore islands. There is no need for an alarm clock on the croft as it has a pair of Cuckoo’s who return from Africa in May and can be heard calling well into August!

Common SealAtlantic Grey Seal Pup

Golden Eagle, Sea Eagles, Peregrine, Hen Harrier, Merlin and Short-Eared Owls all breed in the surrounding area and are regularly sighted. The adjacent moorland also holds Red throated Diver, Arctic Skua, Golden Plover, colonies of Arctic Tern, Common and Black-headed Gulls and even small numbers of the noisy illusive Greenshank.

For the more adventurous in summer there are day trips available from North Uist by boat to both St.Kilda and The Monach Islands.The Monach’s have the second largest rookery of Atlantic Grey Seals in the world with possibly 10,000 females coming ashore in October to give birth. Balranald RSPB Reserve is also well worth a visit where if you are lucky you might see the elusive Corncrake and the declining Corn Bunting.

A very special holiday made more so by the welcome we received`

– Janet and Jim Boyd Somerset

There are also a few pairs of the very rare Red-necked Phalarope left on a few Lochs in Benbecula. A Snowy Owl who doesn’t appear to be able to find his way back to the Arctic and has become known locally as “Elvis” is also a very frequent visitor to the Udal Machair near Grenitote township in the north of the island.

News & Special Offers
thumb-02 Back Again

The female Otter which was seen regularly throughout the summer is back again!